New publication: Typologies and Correlates of Police Violence Against Female Sex Workers Who Inject Drugs at the México–United States Border

December 09, 2020

Drs. West and Henry just published new research on police violence and women on the Mexico/US border.

Typologies and Correlates of Police Violence Against Female Sex Workers Who Inject Drugs at the México–United States Border: Limits of De Jure Decriminalization in Advancing Health and Human Rights

Authors: Brooke S. West, Brandy F. Henry, Niloufar Agah, Alicia Vera, Leo Beletsky, M Gudelia Rangel, Hugo Staines, Thomas L. Patterson, Steffanie A. Strathdee

Dr. Brooke West, Dr. Brandy Henry, and colleagues, just published new research on police violence and women on the Mexico/US border.

Their research found that women who experienced both material and sexual violence from police also experienced a range of other vulnerabilities, like a history of trafficking, poor working conditions and being raped by a client. Police violence, in all its forms, makes sex work less safe and violates human rights.

From the publication Abstract:

"Despite de jure decriminalization of sex work, police violence against FSWID at the México–United States border is pervasive with implications for sex- and drug-related harms. Closing gaps in policy implementation and mitigating material/sexual violence from police is imperative to decreasing economic vulnerability, risk of overdose and HIV, and improving engagement in HIV and harm reduction services."

Read the publication

When thinking about police violence, we need to also consider material and sexual violence and how that impacts a range of public health outcomes.

Dr. Brooke West

Get our newsletter

I’d like to get more stories like this.